One of the knives found by officers after vehicles were recently stopped in West Norfolk. Picture: Lynn Police Twitter

Officers from Norfolk Police have joined a national campaign in a bid to crackdown on knife crime.

The force is one of 44 taking part in the Operation Sceptre action week, highlighting risks associated with carrying knives and targeting offenders.

As part of the campaign, people have been urged to hand over knives without facing prosecution.

These can be taken into any police station with King’s Lynn being the main drop-off station.

People have been urged to hand over kitchen knives, pen knives, flick knives. machetes and any other bladed items.

The county has seen an increase in the number of offences involving knives or bladed weapons from 550 in 2017 to 643 last year.

This has included possession, assault, robbery, criminal damage and affray in which a weapon was used or threatened. 

Offences of a knife being used or threatened against a person have  also increased from 158 in 2017 to 183 last year.

This week’s operation also saw the county’s Trading Standards team checking retail stores to stop knives being sold to anyone aged under 18.

Inspector Darren Brooks said: “Norfolk does not have a big knife crime problem but we have seen the impact knife crime can have on victims, their families and the wider community.

“By carrying a knife you are putting yourself in much greater danger, and more likely to become involved in a violent situation and get injured yourself.

“There may be people who have knives and don’t how to dispose of them. It’s important that these are handed into police to stop them getting into the wrong hands and to reduce the amount of knives being carried on the streets. 

“Every knife surrendered is one less chance of a life being ended or ruined by knife crime.”

A thought-provoking film, shown to  high school-aged students, has also been released to the public as part of the campaign.

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The force is one of 44 taking part in the Operation Sceptre action week, highlighting risks associated with carrying knives and targeting offenders.

As part of the campaign, people have been urged to hand over knives without facing prosecution.

These can be taken into any police station with King’s Lynn being the main drop-off station.

People have been urged to hand over kitchen knives, pen knives, flick knives. machetes and any other bladed items.

The county has seen an increase in the number of offences involving knives or bladed weapons from 550 in 2017 to 643 last year.

This has included possession, assault, robbery, criminal damage and affray in which a weapon was used or threatened. 

Offences of a knife being used or threatened against a person have  also increased from 158 in 2017 to 183 last year.

This week’s operation also saw the county’s Trading Standards team checking retail stores to stop knives being sold to anyone aged under 18.

Inspector Darren Brooks said: “Norfolk does not have a big knife crime problem but we have seen the impact knife crime can have on victims, their families and the wider community.

“By carrying a knife you are putting yourself in much greater danger, and more likely to become involved in a violent situation and get injured yourself.

“There may be people who have knives and don’t how to dispose of them. It’s important that these are handed into police to stop them getting into the wrong hands and to reduce the amount of knives being carried on the streets. 

“Every knife surrendered is one less chance of a life being ended or ruined by knife crime.”

A thought-provoking film, shown to  high school-aged students, has also been released to the public as part of the campaign.

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